Roy Halladay stage

HALL OF FAMER ROY HALLADAY

Born in 1977 in Denver, Colo., Halladay was the Blue Jays’ first-round pick (17th overall) in the 1995 major league amateur draft. On September 27, 1998, in his second big league start, he carried a no-hitter into the bottom of the ninth and had two outs when Detroit Tigers pinch-hitter Bobby Higginson homered. Halladay finished the contest with a one-hitter in the Blue Jays’ 2-1 win.

The intense right-hander became a mainstay in the Blue Jays’ starting rotation beginning in July 2001 and he established himself as the team’s ace the following year when he won 19 games and led American League hurlers in innings pitched (239-1/3) and WAR (7.4) and was selected to his first All-Star team. Halladay would top that the ensuing campaign when he led the league in wins (22), innings pitched (266), complete games (9) and WAR (8.1). For his efforts, he became the third Blue Jay to capture the American League Cy Young Award (Pat Hentgen (1996), Roger Clemens (1997, 1998)).

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Dennis Martinez

HALL OF FAMER DENNIS MARTINEZ

Born in 1954 in Granada, Nicaragua, Martinez recorded 100 wins (second-most in franchise history) in parts of eight seasons with the Montreal Expos from 1986 to 1993. The durable right-hander also ranks second all-time amongst Expos pitchers in games started (233) and innings pitched (1,609) and third in strikeouts (973), complete games (41) and shutouts (13). Nicknamed “El Presidente,” Martinez was the first Nicaraguan to play in the major leagues, and when he tossed a perfect game on July 28, 1991 – the only one in Expos history – the club’s play-by-play man and 2014 Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame inductee Dave Van Horne famously quipped “El Presidente, El Perfecto.”

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Jimmy Archer

HALL OF FAMER JIMMY ARCHER

Born in Dublin, Ireland, Jimmy Archer moved with his family to Montreal as a baby and relocated to Toronto when he was three. At age 20, the young catcher made his professional baseball debut in Fargo, North Dakota. The following year in Boone, Iowa, he would hit .299, convincing the Pittsburgh Pirates to purchase his contract and insert him in their lineup that September.

Serving primarily as a backup catcher, Archer’s next big league assignment was with the Detroit Tigers in 1907. After participating in just 18 games in the regular season, the rifle-armed Canadian was summoned to thwart the Cubs running attack in Game 5 of the World Series. Archer did throw out speedy Cubs outfielder Jimmy Slagle, but the Cubs still won the game and later the series.

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Felipe Alou plaque

HALL OF FAMER FELIPE ALOU

Alou was part of the Expos organization as a player, instructor or manager for 27 of its 36 years of existence. The highly respected baseball man joined the Expos as an instructor following a successful 18-year playing career – that included a 19-game stint with Montreal in 1973 – in which he hit .286, collected 2,101 hits and was selected to three all-star games.

Born in 1935 in Bajos de Haina, San Cristobal, Dominican Republic, Alou developed into a star in the Expos’ coaching ranks shortly after he was hired in 1976. Following managerial stints with the Expos’ Class-A and Double-A affiliates in 1977 and 1978, he was promoted to Dick Williams’ big league staff in 1979 and 1980.

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George Knotty Lee

HALL OF FAMER GEORGE KNOTTY LEE

A true Canadian baseball pioneer, Knotty Lee devoted close to 50 years to the game as a player, manager, scout and league organizer. The Toronto native earned his nickname when his father noticed his spitball twisting and knotting towards home plate. Starting in 1896, Lee excelled as a left-handed hurler with the Toronto Athletic Club. He would also play in the New York State League (1899 to 1901), the New England League (1902 to 1906) and the Empire State League (1907).

In 1911, the determined Canuck was the architect of the Canadian League, the first professional baseball circuit in his country’s history. He would manage teams in Hamilton (1911 to 1913), Toronto (1914) and Guelph (1915) in that seminal circuit. In 1919, he would organize the Class B Michigan-Ontario League, where he was the fiery dugout boss with Brantford (1919, 1920) and London (1925). In 1921 and 1922, he served as business manager for the International League’s Toronto Maple Leafs. During this time, he also marketed his own brand of baseball glove called the “Knotty Lee Special.”

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Allan Roth

HALL OF FAMER ALLAN ROTH

Allan Roth, born in Montreal on May 10, 1917, made a pitch to Branch Rickey in 1944 that made the case for opinions such as on-base percentage being more important than batting average.

“And, wouldn’t it help a manager to know, for example, that a certain batter hit .220 against right-handed pitchers and .300 against lefties?”, Roth asked.

Rickey became intrigued, and his hiring of Roth in 1947 initiated a trend that has made the personal computer an essential element of an MLB clubhouse’s paraphernalia.

Read more HERE.

Tip O'Neill Trophy

JAMES PAXTON TO BE PRESENTED WITH CANADIAN BASEBALL HALL OF FAME’S TIP O’NEILL AWARD

James Paxton to be presented with Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame’s Tip O’Neill Award

Tip O'Neill Trophy

St. Marys, Ont. – Ladner, B.C. native James Paxton will be presented with the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame’s 2018 Tip O’Neill Award in a ceremony prior to the New York Yankees game against the Baltimore Orioles on May 14

Paxton is a first-time winner of this award that the Hall presents annually to the Canadian player judged to have excelled in individual achievement and team contribution while adhering to baseball’s highest ideals.

To determine the winner, the Hall takes into account a number of criteria, including each candidate’s on-the-field performance, contributions to their team, community and charitable endeavors and support in fan voting.

Paxton, who was traded by the Seattle Mariners to the Yankees on November 19, staved off strong competition from Cincinnati Reds slugger and seven-time winner Joey Votto (Etobicoke, Ont.), current Toronto Blue Jays third baseman Vladimir Guerrero Jr. (Montreal, Que.) and St. Louis Cardinals outfielder Tyler O’Neill (Maple Ridge, B.C.) to secure the honour.

“James Paxton had an outstanding season in 2018,” said Scott Crawford, the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame’s director of operations. “Not only did he make history when he became the first Canadian to throw a major league no-hitter on Canadian soil, but he also struck out batters at a near-record rate over the course of the season. He’s definitely a worthy recipient of the award.”

Nicknamed “Big Maple” by Mariners fans, the 6-foot-4 southpaw became the first Canadian pitcher to throw a major league no-hitter on Canadian soil when he held the Blue Jays hitless on May 8 at Rogers Centre. That performance came just six days after he had set a Canadian record by striking out 16 batters on May 2 in a start against the Oakland A’s.

In all, the 30-year-old Paxton had eight starts in which he struck out at least 10 batters and went 11-6 with a 3.76 ERA and fanned 208 batters in 160 1/3 innings. His 208 strikeouts are the second-most by a Canadian left-hander in a major league season and he became one of only two pitchers in big league history to notch 200 strikeouts in a season in 161 or fewer innings.

Among American League pitchers with at least 160 innings pitched in 2018, Paxton finished third in strikeouts per nine innings (11.68), fourth in strikeout-to-walk ratio (4.95), seventh in WHIP (1.10) and ninth in opponents’ batting average against (.224).

Paxton is also off to an excellent start with the Yankees this season. Through seven starts, he is 3-2 with a 3.11 ERA and has fanned 52 batters in 37 2/3 innings.

On top of his strong on-the-field performance, Paxton has also been active in charitable and community endeavors in the greater Vancouver area. He has donated signed memorabilia and game tickets to various charities and has volunteered to provide pitching lessons to youth in the region.

“I am extremely honoured to have been named the Tip O’Neill Award winner for 2018. I am proud to be representing Canada in Major League Baseball and try to do so to the best of my ability,” said Paxton. “I will continue to give everything I have to be the best baseball player and person I can be. Thank you so much to the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame for recognizing my efforts.

The Hall’s Tip O’Neill Award is named after Woodstock, Ont., native James “Tip” O’Neill, who was one of Major League Baseball’s first legitimate stars. With the American Association’s St. Louis Browns in 1887, O’Neill set big league records in hits, doubles, slugging percentage and total bases, while compiling a major league record .492 batting average. Walks were counted as hits in 1887, but if O’Neill’s average was calculated by today’s standards, it would be .435, the second-highest in big league history to Hugh Duffy who hit .440 in 1894.

Past winners of the James “Tip” O’Neill Award:

1984 –Terry Puhl

1985 –Dave Shipanoff

1986 –Rob Ducey

1987 –Larry Walker

1988 –Kevin Reimer

1989 –Steve Wilson

1990 –Larry Walker

1991 –Daniel Brabant

1992 –Larry Walker

1993 –Rob Butler

1994 –Larry Walker

1995 –Larry Walker

1996 –Jason Dickson

1997 –Larry Walker

1998 –Larry Walker

1999 –Jeff Zimmerman

2000 –Ryan Dempster

2001 –Corey Koskie

2001 –Larry Walker

2002 –Eric Gagné

2002 –Larry Walker

2003 –Eric Gagné

2004 – Jason Bay

2005 – Jason Bay

2006 –Justin Morneau

2007 –Russell Martin

2008 –Justin Morneau

2009 – Jason Bay

2010 –Joey Votto

2011 –Joey Votto

2011 –John Axford

2012 –Joey Votto

2013 –Joey Votto

2014 –Justin Morneau

2015 –Joey Votto

2016 –Joey Votto

2017 –Joey Votto

2018 – James Paxton

___________________________________________________________________________

James Paxton recevra le prix Tip O’Neill du Temple de la renommée du baseball canadien

Tip O'Neill Trophy

St-Marys, Ontario – James Paxton, originaire de Ladner en Colombie-Britannique, recevra le prix Tip O’Neill 2018 du Temple de la renommée du baseball canadien lors d’une cérémonie qui aura lieu avant la rencontre entre les Yankees de New York et les Orioles de Baltimore le 14 mai.

Paxton a mérité ce trophée pour la première de sa carrière l’automne dernier, un prix qui est remis annuellement par le Temple au joueur canadien qui a excellé de façon individuelle et apporté une grande contribution à son club tout en adhérant aux plus grands idéaux du baseball.

Pour déterminer un gagnant, le Temple prend en considération de nombreux critères, incluant les résultats de chaque candidat sur le terrain, son importance au sein de l’équipe, son engagement communautaire et le nombre de votes reçu par les amateurs.

Paxton, qui a été échangé des Mariners de Seattle aux Yankees de New York le 19 novembre dernier, a devancé le joueur des Reds de Cincinnati et gagnant à sept reprises Joey Votto (Etobicoke, ON), le futur joueur étoile des Blue Jays de Toronto Vladimir Guerror Jr (Montréal, QC) et le voltigeur des Cardinals de Saint-Louis Tyler O’Neill (Maple Ridge, C.-B.).

« James Paxton a connu une saison 2018 extraordinaire, a dit Scott Crawford, le directeur des opérations du Temple de la renommée et musée du baseball canadien. En plus de réussir le premier match sans point ni coup sûr d’un canadien dans son propre pays dans le baseball majeur, il a pratiquement égalé un record de retraits sur des prises en une saison. Il mérite définitivement cet honneur. »

Surnommé « Big Maple » par les partisans des Mariners, le lanceur gaucher de 6 pieds et 4 pouces est devenu le premier lanceur canadien à lancer un match sans point ni coup sûr au Canada, le 8 mai dernier au Rogers Center. Six jours plus tôt, il avait établi un nouveau record pour un lanceur canadien en retirant 16 frappeurs sur des prises contre les A’s d’Oakland.

Au final, le lanceur de 30 ans a compilé huit départs où il a fait au moins 10 victimes au bâton et a terminé la campagne avec une fiche de 11-6 et une moyenne de points mérités de 3,76. Il a retiré un total de 208 frappeurs sur des prises, le deuxième plus haut total par un lanceur canadien en une saison et il est devenu seulement le deuxième lanceur de l’histoire des Majeures à faire au moins 200 victimes en 161 manches lancées ou moins.

Parmi les lanceurs de la Ligue américaine ayant au moins 160 manches lancées au compteur, Paxton a terminé au troisième rang avec 11,68 K par neuf manches lancées, quatrième dans le ratio retraits/buts sur balles (4,95), septième pour la moyenne WHIP (1,10) et neuvième pour la moyenne au bâton contre lui (,224).

Il connait d’ailleurs un bon début de saison avec sa nouvelle équipe. En sept départs jusqu’ici avec les Yankees, il affiche un dossier de 3-2, une moyenne de points mérités de 3,11 et 52 retraits sur des prises en 37 manches et deux tiers.

En plus de ses performances sur le terrain, Paxton a aussi contribué à plusieurs événements caritatifs dans la grande région de Vancouver. Il a fait don de plusieurs objets autographiés et de billets de baseball en plus d’enseigner bénévolement l’art de lancer aux jeunes de la région.

« Je suis extrêmement honoré de recevoir le prix Tip O’Neill 2018. Je suis fier de représenter le Canada dans la les Ligues majeures et d’essayer de faire du mieux que je peux. Je vais continuer de donner tout ce que j’ai pour être le meilleur joueur de baseball et la meilleure personne. Merci beaucoup au Temple de la renommée et musée du baseball canadien pour cette reconnaissance », a dit Paxton.

Le prix Tip O’Neill du Temple est dédié à James « Tip » O’Neill, de Woodstock (Ontario), qui a été l’une des premières vedettes des Ligues majeures. Avec les Browns de Saint-Louis de l’Association américaine en 1887, O’Neill a établi des records pour les coups sûrs, les doubles, le pourcentage de puissance et le total de buts, en plus de terminer la campagne avec une moyenne au bâton de ,492, un autre record. Les buts sur balles étaient comptabilisés comme des coups sûrs en 1887, mais si nous calculions sa moyenne selon les standards d’aujourd’hui, elle serait de ,435, bonne pour le deuxième rang de tous les temps derrière Hugh Duffy (,440 en 1894).

LAURÉATS :

1984 –Terry Puhl

1985 –Dave Shipanoff

1986 –Rob Ducey

1987 –Larry Walker

1988 –Kevin Reimer

1989 –Steve Wilson

1990 –Larry Walker

1991 –Daniel Brabant

1992 –Larry Walker

1993 –Rob Butler

1994 –Larry Walker

1995 –Larry Walker

1996 –Jason Dickson

1997 –Larry Walker

1998 –Larry Walker

1999 –Jeff Zimmerman

2000 –Ryan Dempster

2001 –Corey Koskie

2001 –Larry Walker

2002 –Eric Gagné

2002 –Larry Walker

2003 –Eric Gagné

2004 – Jason Bay

2005 – Jason Bay

2006 –Justin Morneau

2007 –Russell Martin

2008 –Justin Morneau

2009 – Jason Bay

2010 –Joey Votto

2011 –Joey Votto

2011 –John Axford

2012 –Joey Votto

2013 –Joey Votto

2014 –Justin Morneau

2015 –Joey Votto

2016 –Joey Votto

2017 –Joey Votto

2018 – James Paxton

Claude Raymond

HALL OF FAMER CLAUDE RAYMOND

It was another Canadian, Roland Gladu, who signed Claude Raymond to his first pro contract with the Milwaukee Braves in 1955. After one season as a starting pitcher, the hard-throwing right-hander was converted to a reliever and spent four seasons in the Braves organization before he was claimed in a minor league draft by the Chicago White Sox. He would make his major league debut with the Sox on April 15, 1959.

After just four innings with Chicago, Raymond ended up back in the Braves organization. From 1961 to 1971, while playing with Milwaukee, Houston, Atlanta and Montreal, French Canadian moundsman evolved into one of the National League’s premier relief pitchers. He would finish in the top 10 in saves four times (1962, 1966, 1967, 1970) and earn an all-star selection in 1966.

Read more HERE.

Bill Slack

HALL OF FAMER BILL SLACK

Signed as a pitcher by the Boston Red Sox in 1951, Bill Slack’s professional baseball career would span six decades. As a rookie with Roanoke of the Class-B Piedmont League, Slack won 15 games and hit .361. His finest of 13 minor league seasons was in 1957, when notched 16 wins and posted a 2.24 ERA for Albany of the Class-A Eastern League. He would reach the Triple-A level in the Boston chain, before opting to focus on a coaching career.

Beginning as a manager in the Red Sox organization in 1961, Slack would soon settle in Winston-Salem, Carolina, where he would lead the Red Sox Class-A team for parts of 13 seasons. During that time, his teams captured four Carolina League titles and he helped hone the skills of Jim Rice, Carlton Fisk and Jim Lonborg. When the Red Sox left the Carolina League in 1985, the Atlanta Braves hired Slack as a minor league pitching instructor. During his 14 years in the Braves organization, he aided in the development of, among others, Steve Avery, John Smoltz and Tom Glavine.

Read more HERE.

CELEBRATE MUSEUM MONTH IN THE TOWN OF ST. MARYS

At their April 23 meeting, St. Marys Town Council proclaimed that May would be Museum Month in the Town of St. Marys.

In celebration of Museum Month, the St. Marys Museum and the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum – which just opened its newly renovated site on April 27 – are encouraging locals and tourists alike to visit both museums and pick up a Museum Passport to get stamped at both sites. Completed passports can be returned to either museum by Friday, May 30 and a draw will take place on Monday, June 3 to randomly choose a winner who will receive a prize from both museums.

Coinciding with the start of the tourism season, Museum Month is an excellent opportunity to enjoy Ontario’s many and varied heritage and cultural assets. According to the Ontario Museum Association’s 2014 Profile, Ontario’s museums see more than 7.5 million visits by tourists annually. 55 per cent of museum visits in Ontario are made by local residents and 92 per cent of Ontarians agree that exposure to arts and culture is important to individual well-being.

The Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum is open Tuesday to Sunday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and is located at 386 Church St. S. You can find it online at www.baseballhalloffame.ca or reach the museum by phone at (519) 284-0777.

The St. Marys Museum is open Monday to Friday, from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. and from 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. during the month of May and is located at 177 Church Street South in Cadzow Park. You can find it online at www.townofstmarys.com/museum or reach the museum by phone at (519) 284-3556.

Contacts

Amy Cubberley | Curator & Archivist, St. Marys Museum
(519) 284-2340, ext. 405 | acubberley@town.stmarys.on.ca


Scott Crawford | Director of Operations, Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum
(519) 284-1838 | scott@baseballhalloffame.ca