George Bell

HALL OF FAMER GEORGE BELL

Born in 1959 in San Pedro De Macoris, Dominican Republic, Bell remains the only Blue Jay to win the American League MVP Award. His monster 1987 campaign – that saw him belt a then-club record 47 homers and lead the league in RBIs (134), total bases (369) and extra base hits (83) – is one of the best in franchise history.

Plucked from the Philadelphia Phillies in the 1980 Rule 5 draft, the power-hitting outfielder was an offensive force in Toronto for parts of nine seasons. A three-time all-star and three-time Silver Slugger Award winner, Bell socked over 20 homers in six seasons and recorded more than 85 RBIs seven times with the Jays. He also smashed a major league record three home runs on Opening Day against the Kansas City Royals in 1988. The former slugger ranks in the top five in most of the club’s all-time offensive categories, including third in RBIs (740), total bases (2,201) and extra-base hits (471) and fourth in home runs (202). For his efforts, he was named the club’s MVP four times and was an inaugural member of the Blue Jays’ Level of Excellence in 1996.

Read more HERE.

Talkin’ Baseball with Mike Wilner and Nick Dika

Talkin’ Baseball with Mike Wilner and Nick Dika

Join the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum on Monday, October 26 at 7:07pm for our first live zoom chat with Toronto Blue Jays Broadcaster and Baseball Insider Mike Wilner Insider and Arkell’s musician and Superfan Nick Dika as they discuss everything baseball.

They will discuss the current World Series, the Blue Jays season and future, Canadian baseball and of course touch on the exciting happenings at the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Have your questions ready and make sure you join and watch for the special guest to during the show.

Presented by TD, a proud supporter of the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum and baseball in Canada.

Register HERE today – the event is free – and keep checking on our Facebook page for further information.  On Monday, October 26th in the evening logon to our facebook page to join us that evening!!

Canada Day base 1997

Canadians who played for Tampa Bay and for LA Dodgers

Tampa Bay and the LA Dodgers are in the World Series so thought we would show you a list of the Canadian players history:

Erik Bedard TB

Tampa Bay:
Erik Bedard 2014 – 17 games
Pierre Luc LaForest 2003-05 – 44 games
Rich Buter 1998-99 – 79 games



John Axford Dodgers

LA Dodgers (only including players that played for LA Dodgers):
John Axford 2018 – 5 games
Jamie Romak 2014 – 15 games
Blake Hawksworth 2011 – 49 games
Russell Martin 2006-10, 2019 – 750 games
Paul Quantrill – 2002-03 – 175 games
Eric Gagne 1999-2006 – 298 games
Steve Wilson 1991-93 – 96 games
Tim Harkness 1961-62 – 97 games
Billy Harris 1959 – 1 game

Baseball hall of fame

Curatorial Assistant

Curatorial Assistant

The Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame is adding a Curatorial Assistant position through the Young Canada Works grant to the team. This position is responsible for assisting the Curator in all aspects of our collection. The Curatorial Assistant will work with the Curator to catalogue and perform research on collection objects and archives, and rehouse objects in the collection. They will also assist with updating existing museum records by adding images and reviewing accuracy, and digitizing archival materials. The right player will have relevant museum experience, computer proficiency, exceptional organizational and communication skills and a passion for community service.

Full job description available at www.baseballhalloffame.ca

Please send letter and resume by Sunday, November 1st to:
Scott Crawford, Director of Operations
Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame & Museum
PO Box 1838, 386 Church St. S. St. Marys, ON N4X 1C2 or baseball@baseballhalloffame.ca

Father Ronald Cullen

HALL OF FAMER FATHER RONALD CULLEN

After landing a position at Windsor’s Assumption High School in 1948, Father Ronald Cullen dedicated over 50 years of service to the city. With an approach emphasizing discipline, the iconic sports figure inspired thousands of young football, hockey and baseball players during his venerable coaching career.

The Windsor sports legend was the bench boss of 13 high school hockey teams that advanced to the All-Ontario championships and helped spur Marc Reaume, Mike Eaves, Murray Eaves and Ed Mio to NHL careers. One of the best amateur baseball coaches in Canadian history, Cullen’s teams almost always vied for city, provincial and national titles.

Read more HERE.

Job Posting – Part-time Financial and Fundraising Administration Coordinator

Job Posting – Part-time Financial and Fundraising Administration Coordinator

The Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame is adding a part-time Financial and Fundraising Administration Coordinator to the team.  This position is responsible for clerical, financial, customer service activities and will assist with fundraising.  The right player will have relevant office experience, computer proficiency, exceptional organizational and communication skills and a passion for community service.

Full job description available HERE

Please send cover letter and resume by Monday, October 26 to:
Scott Crawford, Director of Operations
Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame & Museum
baseball@baseballhalloffame.ca or PO Box 1838, 386 Church St. S., St. Marys, ON N4X 1C2

Tony Kubek

HALL OF FAMER TONY KUBEK

Born in Milwaukee, Wis., in 1935, Kubek won three World Series as a shortstop with the New York Yankees between 1957 and 1965 before becoming a popular broadcaster for NBC. He spent 25 seasons behind the mike for the network and called 11 World Series and 10 All-Star games, as well as the Saturday afternoon “Game of the Week.” Along the way, he teamed with legendary play-by-play men like Jim Simpson, Curt Gowdy and Bob Costas.

The Toronto Blue Jays were fortunate to land Kubek as an analyst on their TV broadcasts in 1977 and during his 13 seasons in the booth for the club, he educated tens of thousands of Canadian viewers on CTV and TSN about the sport. On top of the insights he could provide as a former player, Kubek’s no-nonsense style and quick and extensive analysis made him one of the best and most respected analysts of his era. While with the Blue Jays, aside from his analysis, he was one of the first broadcasters to ask to communicate with the director in the production truck to suggest camera shots during the game that would improve the broadcast.

Read more HERE.

Charles Pop Smith

HALL OF FAMER CHARLES POP SMITH

Nicknamed “Pop” because of his signature bushy mustache, Charles Smith is the most successful Nova Scotian to play in the big leagues. After his family relocated to Boston in the 1870s, he evolved into a top prospect and began suiting up for the Binghamton Crickets, an independent pro team, where he earned raves for his fielding prowess and speed.

His major league debut came with the Cincinnati Reds in 1880. Manning second base for the struggling club, Smith topped the Reds in RBIs and triples. After two seasons of toiling with several different clubs, Smith enjoyed his finest campaign in 1883, when he recorded 106 hits for the Columbus Buckeyes and topped the American Association with 17 triples. He followed that up with 106 more hits in 1884, a season in which he also led American Association second basemen in assists.

Read more HERE.

Harry Simmons

HALL OF FAMER HARRY SIMMONS

Harry Simmons’ unrivalled knowledge of baseball history, rules and statistics landed him a job with the International League in 1946, the same historic season that Jackie Robinson played his first year of integrated baseball with the Montreal Royals. After handling much of the press coverage related to Robinson, Simmons wore many hats in the league’s executive office over the next 20 years, and was often consulted on issues related to player contracts, finances and staffing. Previously in New York, the International League’s head office was transferred to Montreal in 1953. Simmons would move his family to Cartierville, Quebec the following year and maintain his Canadian residence until 1995.

Read more HERE.

Ron Stead

HALL OF FAMER RON STEAD

Ron Stead grew up in Toronto close to Maple Leaf Stadium, where he struck up a friendship with Leafs’ trainer, Bill Smith. Stead acted as the Leafs’ mascot in 1946, before becoming batboy the following year. He also honed his pitching skills by tossing batting practice. As his arm strengthened, he would sign a playing contract with his employer. The Leafs sent him to the Florida State League, where he recorded 17 wins and a sparkling 2.43 ERA for Gainesville in 1957.

After that campaign, the Leafs asked him to go back to the Florida State League, but Stead declined and returned to Canada, where he would join the Intercounty League’s Brantford Red Sox. In his near decade with Brantford (1958 to 1966), the crafty southpaw evolved into the top pitcher in the circuit and led the Red Sox to six championships. In 1960, he won 12 games and logged a league record 149 innings. He would top that in 1963 when he went 14-1 with a miniscule 0.63 ERA.

Read more HERE.